Quick Answer: Why are the Himalayas a biodiversity hotspot?

The Himalayan region contains the tallest mountains in the world, as well as incredible animals found only there, including the giant panda, the wild water buffalo, and the black-necked crane—the only alpine crane in the world. Deforestation and climate change have made the Himalaya a biodiversity hotspot.

Is Himalayas a biodiversity hotspot?

Eastern Himalayas form a part of the Himalayan global biodiversity hotspot. This region is exceptionally rich in diversity and endemism. It comprises of parts of Nepal, Bhutan, Sikkim, Arunanchal Pradesh and extends up to Burma.

What are hotspots of Himalayan biodiversity?

Stretching in an arc over 3,000 kilometers of northern Pakistan, Nepal, Bhutan and the northwestern and northeastern states of India, the Himalaya hotspot includes all of the world’s mountain peaks higher than 8,000 meters. This includes the world’s highest mountain, Sagarmatha (Mt.

Why is biodiversity a hotspot?

To qualify as a biodiversity hotspot, a region must meet two strict criteria: It must have at least 1,500 vascular plants as endemics — which is to say, it must have a high percentage of plant life found nowhere else on the planet. A hotspot, in other words, is irreplaceable. … In other words, it must be threatened.

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Where is the Himalayan hotspot?

Stretching in an arc over 3,000 kilometers of northern Pakistan, Nepal, Bhutan and the northwestern and northeastern states of India, the Himalaya hotspot includes all of the world’s mountain peaks higher than 8,000 meters.

Why Western Ghats and Himalayas are considered as one of the biodiversity hotspots in the world?

The Western Ghats are one of the world’s biodiversity hotspots with over 5,000 flowering plants, 139 mammals, 508 birds and 179 amphibian species. At least 325 globally threatened species occur here. The range covers 60,000km2 and forms the catchment area for a complex of river systems that drain almost 40% of India.

What is biodiversity hotspots Why is India considered as a mega biodiversity hotspot?

An area is known as a hotspot if it contains at least 0.5 per cent of endemic plant species. India is considered a mega-diversity hotspot due to the great diversity of organisms found here, ranging from eastern to western ghats to northern and southern India as well. Mainly Western ghats are now at high risk.

Which is the hotspot of biodiversity?

They are western ghats and Sri Lanka, Indo-Burma, and Eastern Himalayas. Note that even the biodiversity hotspots cover less than two percent of the world’s total land area, by protecting these regions we can decrease the rate of species extinctions by 30%.

What are hotspots explain the spots of India?

Biodiversity Hotspots in India – Himalayas, Indo-Burma, Western Ghats & Sundaland. … Coined by Norman Myers, the term “Biodiversity hotspots” can be defined as the regions which are known for their high species richness and endemism.

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What is biodiversity hotspot example?

Biodiversity hotspots are regions that are both biologically fertile (rich distribution of plants and animals) and highly threatened. … Examples of biodiversity hotspots are forest habitats as they constantly face destruction and degradation due to illegal logging, pollution and deforestation.

What do you mean by ecological hotspot?

Ecological hotspots are areas with outstanding biodiversity or a high concentration of biological values. These values can refer to threatened or endemic species, unique ecosystems, or globally important numbers of a particular species.

What is Himalayan hotspot?

The Himalaya Hotspot is home to the worl. d’s highest mountains, including Mt. Everest. The mountains rise abruptly, resulting in a diversity of ecosystems that range from alluvial grasslands and subtropical broadleaf forests to alpine meadows above the tree line.

What are the two important biodiversity hotspots in India?

Here’s a look at 6 biodiversity hotspots of India

  • Indo-Burma region. …
  • Western Ghats. …
  • Sundaland. …
  • Sunderbans.